National Missing Children’s Day: 5 Ways to Keep Children Safe | WUSA9.com

In 1983, Ronald Reagan proclaimed May 25th as National Missing Children’s Day. All month long, WUSA9 has shared faces of missing children from our area in in hopes of helping to bring them home. Here are 5 ways keep your children safe & join WUSA9 in raising awareness of missing children in our area

1. Talk honestly to your kids about protecting themselves
Former President of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, Ernie Allen, encourages parents to talk candidly with their children about safety. Role playing exercises could help kids protect themselves if they’re confronted with immediate threats or predators.

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What is the difference between an AMBER Alert, Missing Child Alert? | ClickOrlando

America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response, or AMBER Alert, was created in 1996 as a response for local police to find abducted children, according to U.S. Department of Justice.

The alert system, later named Amber, was created after Amber Hagerman, 9, was kidnapped while riding her bike in Arlington, Texas and later murdered.

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Why some teens are ‘at risk’ while others are simply considered missing – LA Times

When 16-year-old Kimberly Arteaga went missing three years ago, she wasn’t considered to be “at risk.”

How that determination was made was called into question this week when investigators revealed that human remains found in a park in southern Chula Vista in January were those of the Lemon Grove girl. She had been killed.

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Missing Children Fast Facts | FOX 40 WICZ TV

(CNN) — Here is a look at missing children in the United States. There are several different types of missing children: runaways, family abductions, lost or “thrown away,” and non-family abductions. Recent advances in technology, communications through public alerts and greater cooperation from law enforcement have helped solve many cases quickly.

Statistics:
According to the FBI’s National Crime Information Center (NCIC) Missing Person File, there are 88,040 active missing person records, of which juveniles under the age of 18 account for 33,706 (38.3%) of the records. (as of December 31, 2016)

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Missing teen cases often hampered by misinformation | ydr.com

When 16-year-old Madison Krumrine went missing on March 23, the news spread quickly.

There were suspicions, expressed on and circulated by social media, mostly Facebook, that foul play was afoot. She was last seen at 8:30 p.m. that Thursday evening and did not show up for classes the next morning at South Western Senior High School. She had left her cellphone behind, leading to speculation that, perhaps, something terrible had happened to her.

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Having a missing loved one shatters a family | INDYSTAR

Not knowing what happened to her daughter remains the worst part for Rebecca Russell.

Larissa Sam, 24, disappeared a year and a half ago. Her car was found June 21, 2015, in Mars Hill on the southwest side. A tire was flat. The keys were in the ignition. Sam’s phone, shoes, purse and money remained in the car.

Russell tries to ignore the negative thoughts that creep into her mind. She just has to keep faith that she will find her daughter.

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Why most missing children and runaways won’t get an Amber Alert | KJCT8

COLUMBIA & RICHMOND Co., Ga. (WRDW/WAGT) — It’s not all the time you’ll see an Amber Alert pop up on your phone.

It’s even less frequent the Amber Alert is from your area, but that doesn’t mean less children are going missing or running away.

“They are reported everyday,” said Daniel Gaston, an investigator in Columbia County, Geogia. “If we issued Amber Alerts every time a child went missing, your phone will be constantly going off.”

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