NY – Missing Teen Feared Abducted For Sex Trafficking | Huffington Post

It’s been almost two months since a Pennsylvania teen who’d recently moved to New York City disappeared.

Since Sept. 20, no one has seen or heard from 19-year-old Corinna Slusser, an aspiring cosmetologist who grew up in Bloomsburg.

[Click here for full story]

Advertisements

Missing teen believed to be victim of sex trafficking | New York Post

Police believe a missing Pennsylvania teen last seen in Queens may be the victim of sex trafficking, police sources said.

Cops on Monday released photos of 19-year-old Corinna Slusser, who was last seen on Sept. 20 at the Haven Motel on Woodhaven Boulevard in Rego Park.

[Click here for full story]

Aurora mom fears daughter missing for nearly a year could be held by sex traffickers – The Denver Post

During the months since her daughter disappeared, Sabrina Jones has heard numerous tips about the girl’s whereabouts.

But rather than provide comfort, those tantalizing bits of information led to more grief, Jones said Tuesday. “When we found out that they were dead ends, it was hard.”

[Click here for full story]

Green Bay Police search for missing teenager, considered endangered | WLUK

GREEN BAY (WLUK) — An endangered missing person alert has been issued for a teenager by the Wisconsin Crime Alert Network.

According to the alert, 16-year-old Christina Kordus went missing from Green Bay on Tuesday. She was last seen at 990 Coppens Road, just after 7 p.m.

[Click here for full story]

GA – Amiyah Roach: Video Captures Missing Teen Headed For Dog Walk Just Before She Disappears In Stone Mountain, Georgia

amiyah roach

Amiyah Roach, a 15-year-old black teen, is missing from her home in Stone Mountain, Georgia. CBS-46 is reporting that Amiyah Roach disappeared just after leaving her home to walk her dog. A home video captured the girl just as she walked out of her home. Amiyah Roach has been missing since July 14. she was last seen leaving her home with her dog in her arms. She was wearing dark pants and a light colored shirt. Amiyah Roach is five-feet, 11-inches and weighs around 170 pounds.

As of now, there has not been a lot of media coverage about the missing girl. Her mother, Tomeka Minick, fears that the police are not taking her daughter‘s case seriously due to her background. Tomeka Minick explained that her daughter has had a troubled life, one that included her being a former victim of sex trafficking.

[Click here for full story]

Missing kids now seen as possible victims, not runaways

One of every six runaways in the U.S. was likely a victim of sex trafficking in 2014.

With sexual exploitation that prevalent, Ohio police have changed how they look for missing people. Everyone who has trained to become a police officer since mid-2013 has received 12 hours of instruction on how to spot signs of human trafficking, said John Gibson, criminal justice program director at Zane State College. Additional training for current officers is available through the state attorney general.

“The issue of child sex trafficking is something we are becoming more and more aware of. We don’t look at a child as a runaway but as a possible victim,” said Robert Lowery, vice president with the missing children division of the National Center of Missing and Exploited Children.

[Click here for full story]

Black and Missing in America: Why We Speak Up for This Often Ignored and Voiceless Group | Natalie Wilson

When the Black and Missing Foundation, Inc (www.BAMFI.org) began in 2008, 30 percent of all persons missing were of color. Sadly, that number has grown — seemingly to a new record setting incline. Last year, according to the FBI, there were more than 242,000 persons of color reported missing — that is 40 percent of all persons reported missing — the key word reported. God only knows about the individuals who were not reported.

While we continue to diligently rally for their safe return, we must acknowledge that all missing persons cases are not treated equally. Let’s be very clear, there is a disparity in law enforcement assistance and media coverage. Many of our children are classified as runaways, therefore, they do not receive the Amber Alert or our men and women are stereotyped as being involved in some type of criminal enterprise. Where is the public outcry for America’s vulnerable citizens who are being sold into sex trafficking? Some of this rational is due to lack of understanding, and, yes, racism. Regardless of the reason, it is unacceptable.

[Click here for full story]